Hilsdon History



Henry Hilsdon Ltd.  Glasgow Organ Works.  A brief History of the Company

The firm of Henry Hilsdon Ltd was based in large and spacious workshops behind the Mitchell Library at the west end of Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, Scotland.  They were famed throughout the country for their quality of workmanship and attention to detail in all of the instruments they built.  They had a considerably large output of new and rebuilt organs, and many times, they were called in by churches to rebuild or improve instruments built by other makers.  They also had a substantial business carrying out tuning and maintenance, not just on their own organs, but on many by and for Hill, Norman & Beard, and for churches with other makes of pipe organ.

Henry ( Harry) Hilsdon had been apprenticed to the firm of Norman & Beard Ltd prior to their amalgamation with Wm Hill & Son in the middle of the 1890’s and learned his craft well.  As a ‘journeyman’ he worked with Norman & Beard during the period that Robert Hope-Jones, the ‘inventor’ of the theatre organ, was associated with the firm, and had to have met and worked with this eccentric, inventive genious.

Harry Hilsdon was originally established in offices in Glasgow as the Scottish representative of Norman and Beard Ltd, operating from 8 Dorset Street, Glasgow from 1904 to 1911.  For part of this period he also used his home address of 17 Polwarth Gardens, Hyndland, Glasgow between 1908 and 1911.

In 1912 he purchased the Norman & Beard office at 8 Dorset Street, and ran his business from here for a year, before moving almost next door to 4 Dorset Street and opening a fully equipped workshop with adjacent offices.  In 1914 he opened a branch in Aberdeen at 261 Union Street which lasted until the onset of World War 2.  Harry Hilsdon died in 1935 but his firm continued in the Dorset Street 'Glasgow Organ Works' until 1976, the last Managing Director being Wilfred Southward, who, as an apprentice, had worked on the New Savoy and Playhouse organs as well as their two Unit cinema organs.  Following his retirement, the business of the firm was wound up.

Although Hilsdon's chest and reservoir designs could be seen to owe much influence to his training at Norman & Beard, he also introduced many details and designs of his own.  In particular, he used all electric (electro-mechanical) Reisner relays and Stop Tabs in his theatre and orchestral organs, obtaining his electric action parts directly from Reisner Inc. in America.  His unit chest design was almost identical to those manufactured by Hill, Normal and Beard for their Christie theatre organs, except that most of the timber he used was mahogany instead of yellow pine.

The quality of the firm's woodworking department was superb.  Their consoles were truly items of excellent cabinet maker's craft, complete with concealed joints and usually manufactured from dark French Mahogany, which resulted in a lustrous, deep, almost black sheen, to the finished furniture.  Their tonal percussion was manufactured by Deagan of Chicago and imported directly from the United States of America.  Famed worldwide as one of the best manufacturers of tonal percussion, Deagan's Carillon Harps were used by the Rudolph Wurlitzer Manufacturing Company in their Wurlitzer Hope-Jones unit orchestras on stops labelled ‘Chrysoglott’.

Hilsdon organs were expensive when compared with instruments from other Scottish builders like Andrew Watt of Glasgow or Arthur Ingram of Edinburgh.  They built a total of three ‘Orchestral’ organs and two ‘Unit’ organs for Scottish cinemas and theatres.  The first of these, was a 2 manual Orchestral organ for the West End (later Empress, later the New (Jimmy Logan's) Metropole) Theatre in Glasgow in 1913.   This early instrument showed some of the trademarks which were to appear later in the two large organs he built, one for the New Savoy in Glasgow, the other for the Playhouse in Edinburgh.


West End Cinema, St. George's Cross, Glasgow

The Empress instrument was divided either side of the proscenium, with the Great and part of the Pedal on the left, and the Swell and the remainder of the pedal on the Right.  The action was electro-pneumatic, and a straight row of stop tabs above the upper manual provided stop control.  Although the console was in a fixed position in the Orchestra Pit it used all electric actions, which in 1913, was quite adventurous not just in Scotland, but in the UK as a whole, and in the brochure published for the opening of the theatre, it was stated that this was the first time electric action had been used in a theatre installation anywhere in the UK.  Like all of his later theatre instruments, it incorporated a unified 'trumpet' stop.

The Specification of the Orchestral Organ installed in the West End Playhouse,
later Empress Theatre; New Metropole; finally Jimmy Logan’s Metropole Theatre.
The theatre closed in 1972 and was demolished in 1990

The all electric console was in a fixed positon in the orchestra pit but had been removed and scrapped by the theatre during the 1940s,
the remainder of the organ was demolished with the theatre as the building was too unsafe to gain access.

The organist at opening was a Mr J.A. Clapper, L.R.A.M.

The organ was installed in two chambers, one each side of the proscenium, above the seating boxes.  The Pedal Bourdon/Bass Flute unit was installed in the same chamber as the Swell division, on the right side of the auditorium.

The principles employed later in both the Savoy and Playhouse organs are obvious here.


H. Hilsdon Ltd, Glasgow Organ Works, 1913.
2 Manuals, cc-c 61 notes, and concave and radiating Pedals, CCC-F, 30 notes.
Electro-pneumatic action.
All electric console fitted with Reisner Stop Tab actions.

GREAT (enclosed)     SWELL (enclosed) 
Contra Viola16 (A)     Violin Diapason  8
Claribel  8     Stopped Diapason  8
Gamba  8     Viol d'Orchestre  8
Dolce  8     Viol Celeste  8tc
Harmonic Flute  4     Octave Viola  4
Piccolo  2     Horn  8
Bombarde16 (B)     Clarinet  8
Tuba  8 (B)     Orchestral Oboe  8
Great Tremulant      Swell Tremulant
Great Octave      Swell Sub Octave
Great Reeds Octave      Swell Octave
Swell Sub Octave to Great     
Swell to Great   
Swell Octave to Great   
 
PEDAL (enclosed)
Violone  16 (A)         5 thumb pistons to Great
Bourdon  16 (C)         5 thumb pistons to Swell
Bass Flute    8 (C)         3 thumb pistons to Pedal - duplicated by toe pistons
Trombone  16 (B)  
Great to Pedal          1 reversible thumb piston - Great to Pedal
Swell to Pedal          1 reversible toe piston - Great to Pedal

Balanced Expression Pedal to Great
Balanced Expression Pedal to Swell

Discus Blower


Savoy Cinema and Ballroom, Hope Street, Glasgow

In 1916, Hilsdon built his largest Orchestral Organ, being the three manual instrument for the Savoy Cinema and Ballroom, Hope Street, Glasgow, for use both as a solo instrument and with the orchestra.  Once again, the organ was installed in chambers either side of the stage in an identical layout to that used in the Playhouse 12 years later, with the Accompaniment and Solo on one side and the Orchestral on the other.

This instrument must have been successful, as Samuel Leach, the organist there, when engaged by the Playhouse to design an instrument for them 11 years later, immediately chose the firm of Henry Hilsdon to build an organ along very similar lines to the earlier one in the Savoy.

The Savoy organ was removed by Hilsdon in 1934 following the purchase of the cinema by Gaumont when a second-hand 2 manual 7 rank Christie Unit organ from the Tivoli Cinema, Partick, was installed in its place after the Savoy's interior was completely remodelled, and it re-opened as the New Savoy Cinema.  The Vox Humana rank from the original Savoy organ is one of the sets of pipes which was given to Gordon Lucas when Hilsdon had to vacate their workshops in 1974.

The Specification of the Orchestral Organ installed in the Savoy Cinema, Glasgow, 1916


H. Hilsdon Ltd, Glasgow Organ Works, 1916.

3 Manuals, cc-c 61 notes, and concave and radiating Pedals, CCC-F, 30 notes.

Electro-pneumatic action.

All electric console fitted with Reisner Stop Tab actions.

3 Manuals, CC-C, 61 notes; Pedals CCC-F, 30 notes

Enclosed in two chambers, one each side of the proscenium arch, Solo and Accompaniment on Auditorium Left
with the Orchestral on Auditorium Right.

PEDAL  
Open Bass16Right
Bourdon16Left (from Solo Quint Flute)
Octave  8Right
Bass Flute  8Left (from Solo Quint Flute)
Violone16Left (from Accmpt. Contra Viola)
Violoncello  8Left (from Accmpt. Contra Viola)
Bombarde16Left (Bombarde Unit)
Clarion  8Left (Bombarde Unit)
Bass Drum (tap)
Kettle Drum (roll)
Clash Cymbal (sic)(tap)
Roll Cymbal
Orchestral to Pedal
Accompaniment to Pedal (all manual couplers play through)
Solo to Pedal
  
ORCHESTRAL lower manual (Right)
Hohl Flote  8
Dulciana  8
Concert Flute  4
Orchestral Piccolo  2
Viola da Gamba  8
Clarionet  8
Vox Humana  8
Orchestral Oboe  8
Marimba Harp
Carillon Harp
Glockenspiel
Sleigh Bells
Tremulant
Sub Octave
Unison Off
Octave
Solo to Orchestral
  
ACCOMPANIMENT centre manual (Left)
Contra Viola16
Open Diapason  8
Claribel Flute  8
Dolce  8
Octave  4
Fifteenth  2
Contra Bombarde16
Bombarde  8
Octave Bombarde  4
Snare Drum Roll
Castanets
Tambourine
Chinese Block
Tom-tom
Tremulant
Octave
Solo sub-octave to Accompaniment
Solo to Accompaniment
Solo octave to Accompaniment
Orchestral sub-octave to Accompaniment
Orchestral to Accompaniment
Orchestral Octave to Accompaniment
ACCOMPANIMENT 2nd Touch
Snare Drum Roll
Castanets
Tambourine
Chinese Block
Tom-tom
  
SOLO upper manual (Left)
Quint Flute16
Violin Diapason  8
Tibia Clausa  8
Stopped Flute  8
Octave Viola  4
Harmonics (15, 17, 19, 22)IV rks
Viol d'Orchestre  8
Viol Celestetc8
Contra Bombarde16
Bombarde  8
Octave Bombarde  4
Cathedral Chimes
Carillon Harp(Right)
Snare Drum
Castanets
Tremulant
Bombarde Tremulant
Sub Octave
Unison Off
Octave
Orchestral to Solo
Balanced Swell Pedal to Left Side
Balanced Swell Pedal to Right Side
Balanced General Crescendo Pedal (Affects whole organ)
  
5 Thumb pistons each to Solo, Accompaniment & Orchestral
Reversible thumb pistons to :-
Accompaniment to Pedal
Accompaniment (1st Touch) Snare Drum
Pedal Kettle Drum
 
EFFECTS
Telephone Bell (pearlised thumb piston in Accmpt treble key cheek)
Birdsong (pearlised thumb piston in Accmpt bass key cheek)
EFFECTS ON TOE PISTON
Horse Hoofs
Train
Surf
Boat Whistle
Train Whistle
Syren
Triangle
Fire Bell
Klaxon
 
Blower Start / Stop controls
Lift Up / Stop / Down controls
 
Balanced Expression Pedal to Left Chamber
Balanced Expression Pedal to Right Chamber

Ventil Switches to :-
Pedal Open, Bourdon, Violone, Traps & Effects, Percussions, Trumpet/Bombarde, Solo, Accompaniment, Orchestral

Discus Blower


Playhouse, Greenside Place, Edinburgh

The Playhouse organ was designed to form part of the resident orchestra and it must be said that it lacked the extreme 'solo' voices which a Compton or Wurlitzer 'unit' organ would have had, being based almost upon the traditional 'romantic' style of classical instrument.   This was to become an important defect some 45 years later, when the organ started to be used again, but without orchestra, for solo intermissions and other presentations.


The original console of the Playhouse Hilsdon in situ, 1970.

The Edinburgh Playhouse was designed by Scottish architect John Fairweather, and was intended to be ‘the most luxurious theatre in Scotand’.  It was to be capable of presenting the operas of the day, was equipped with a massive (by UK standards) 76 foot wide stage, with a 49ft x 29 ft proscenium opening.  The stage was equipped with a full counterweight type flying system and stage lighting system.  Backstage, there were band Rooms and 25 dressing rooms, almost all of which had individual toilets and bathrooms.   Store rooms and a complex machinery area completed the backstage provision which extended over 10 floors.


The Playhouse Console in
Hilsdon's works, 1928.


The Edinburgh Playhouse should have opened in mid 1928 with 'White Horse Inn' on stage, but due to the building suffering subsidence problems during the final stages of its erection, the opening was delayed for over a year, eventually opening on 12th August 1929, with the film 'A Doctor's Secret' starring Ruth Chatterton.  Samuel Leach was at the organ.

The grouping of the stops, flutes and diapasons, followed by strings, then the chorus reeds and lastly the orchestral reeds, with each type of tone then being grouped by pitch, was followed through from his first instrument, so the stop order as shown is correct.

The Original Specification of the Orchestral Organ installed in the Playhouse, Edinburgh

H. Hilsdon Ltd, Glasgow Organ Works, 1928.

3 Manuals, CC-C, 61 notes; Pedals CCC-F, 30 notes
Enclosed in two chambers, one each side of the proscenium arch

PEDAL  
Open Bass16Right
Bourdon16Left (from Solo Quint Flute)
Octave  8Right
Bass Flute  8Left (from Solo Quint Flute)
Violone16Left (from Accmpt. Contra Viola)
Violoncello  8Left (from Accmpt. Contra Viola)
Bombarde16Left (Bombarde Unit)
Clarion  8Left (Bombarde Unit)
Bass Drum (tap)
Kettle Drum (roll)
Clash Cymbal (sic)(tap)
Roll Cymbal
Orchestral to Pedal
Accompaniment to Pedal (all manual couplers play through)
Solo to Pedal
PEDAL 2nd Touch
Bass Drum (tap)
Kettle Drum (roll)
Clash Cymbal (sic)(tap)
Roll Cymbal
  
ORCHESTRAL lower manual (Right)
Hohl Flote  8
Dulciana  8
Concert Flute  4
Orchestral Piccolo  2
Viola da Gamba  8
Clarionet  8
Vox Humana  8
Orchestral Oboe  8
Marimba Harp
Carillon Harp
Glockenspiel
Sleigh Bells
Tremulant
Sub Octave
Unison Off
Octave
Solo to Orchestral
  
ACCOMPANIMENT centre manual (Left)
Contra Viola16
Open Diapason  8
Claribel Flute  8
Dolce  8
Octave  4
Fifteenth  2
Contra Bombarde16
Bombarde  8
Octave Bombarde  4
Snare Drum Roll
Castanets
Tambourine
Chinese Block
Tom-tom
Tremulant
Octave
Solo sub-octave to Accompaniment
Solo to Accompaniment
Solo octave to Accompaniment
Orchestral sub-octave to Accompaniment
Orchestral to Accompaniment
Orchestral Octave to Accompaniment
ACCOMPANIMENT 2nd Touch
Snare Drum Roll
Castanets
Tambourine
Chinese Block
Tom-tom
  
SOLO upper manual (Left)
Quint Flute16
Violin Diapason  8
Stopped Flute  8
Octave Viola  4
Viol d'Orchestre  8
Viol Celestetc8
French Horn  8
Contra Bombarde16
Bombarde  8
Octave Bombarde  4
Cathedral Chimes
Carillon Harp(Right)
Snare Drum
Castanets
Tremulant
Bombarde Tremulant
Sub Octave
Unison Off
Octave
Orchestral to Solo
Balanced Swell Pedal to Left Side
Balanced Swell Pedal to Right Side
Balanced General Crescendo Pedal (Affects whole organ)
  
5 Thumb pistons each to Solo, Accompaniment & Orchestral
Reversible thumbs pistons to :-
Accompaniment to Pedal
Accompaniment (1st Touch) Snare Drum
Pedal Kettle Drum
 
EFFECTS
Telephone Bell (pearlised thumb piston in Accmpt key cheek)
EFFECTS ON TOE PISTON
Horse Hoofs
Train
Surf
Boat Whistle
Birdsong
Syren
Triangle
Fire Bell
Klaxon

Ventil Switches to:-
Bombarde, Solo, Quint Flute, Accompaniment, Violone, Orchestral, Open Wood, Traps & Effects

Blower Start / Stop controls
Lift Up / Stop / Down controls (on side of bench)

The Music Desk and Pedal Light were originally controlled by the Conductor and Stage Manager.
                                                                                      
An extract from the original Accounts Records for the Playhouse Edinburgh Ltd shows that Mr Leach was being paid £5 per week, which was 10 shillings (£0.50p) more than the conductor, whilst John Foubister, the Chief Engineer, who was a highly qualified building engineer and who took responsibility for some of the designs of the reinforcing works which had to be carried out during the period of 1928-1933, was only paid the sum of £2/15/00 (£2.75) a week.

The Playhouse organ was used extensively, along with the’Playhouse Rising Orchestra’, until 1938 when the orchestra was dismissed.  The organ however, continued to be used in this successful independent cinema until 1942.  Following the resignation of the organist who left for active service in the second world war, the organ was taken out of use, eventually being taken off full time maintenance in 1948 as the use of organs in cinemas declined in popularity generally.

Although Wilfred Southward gave a huge amount of free technical advice to the volunteers who refurbished the Playhouse organ in 1970, the firm was never officially involved with the instrument after 1948.

For later stop lists of the Playhouse Hilsdon, please refer to the next section, The Hilsdon organ of the Edinburgh Playhouse

Palace Picture House, Princes Street, Edinburgh


The Palace, Princes St, Edinburgh

In 1929, the Playhouse’s sister cinema in Edinburgh, the Palace Picture House at the East End of Princes Street, was refurbished and the projectors were fitted with sound equipment and a smaller Hilsdon organ installed.   This was a 2 manual instrument with 8 pipe ranks, the two pipe chambers and blower room being positioned centrally above the proscenium arch, an installation style common in Edinburgh cinemas.

The console of the Palace Picture House in Hilsdon's works, 1929

Prior to completion

and completed

The cinema was one of the first in Edinburgh to succumb to the competition of television, and the building was purchased by F W Woolworth, who had a large store in the adjacent building, and wanted to expand.  The organ was removed by Hilsdon and subsequently stored in their works, until the creation of a new motorway through the centre of the city forced their closure, and the subsequent demolition of the Glasgow Organ Works.

The grouping of the stops, diapasons and strings followed by tibia and flute, then the chorus reeds and lastly the orchestral reeds, with each type of tone then being grouped by pitch, was subtly different from the 'orchestral' instruments, so the stop order as shown is correct.
The Specification of the Unit Organ installed in the Palace Picture House, Princes Street, Edinburgh

H. Hilsdon Ltd, Glasgow Organ Works, 1929.

Organ installed in two chambers above the proscenium

2 Manuals CC to C, 61 notes, and
Concave and Radiating pedalboard CCC-F 30 notes.


MAIN CHAMBER = Diaphonic Diapason, Stopped Flute, Viol d'Orchestre, Viol Celeste, Traps, Effects, Chimes

SOLO CHAMBER = Tuba Horn / Bombarde, Tibia Clausa, Clarinet, Vox Humana, Marimba Harp, Carrillon Harp, Glockenspiel, Sleigh Bells

Stops were grouped by pitch and tonality

PEDAL ORGAN  ACCOMPANIMENT (lower manual) 
Harmonic Bass32 Violone16
Diaphone16 Diaphonic Diapason  8
Diaphonic Diapason  8 Violoncello  8
Violone16 Cello Celeste  8tc
Violoncello  8 Octave  4
Bourdon16 Violin  4
Bass Flute  8 Violina  2
Bombarde16 Bourdon16
Octave Bombarde  8 Tibia Clausa  8
Clarinet  8 Stopped Flute  8
Bass Drum  Stopped Flute  4
Kettle Drum  Flute Twelfth2,2/3
Clash Cymbal  Flageolet  2
Roll Cymbal  Bombarde16
   Tuba Horn  8
Pedal Second Touch  Tuba Clarion  4
Bass Drum  Clarinet  8
Kettle Drum  Clarinet  4
Clash Cymbal  Vox Humana16tc
Roll Cymbal  Vox Humana  8
   Vox Humana  4
   Carillon Harp  8
SOLO (upper manual)   Marimba  8
Violone16 Snare Drum  
Diaphonic Diapason        8  
Violoncello  8         
Octave  4   
Octave Viola  4 Accompaniment Second Touch   
Twelfth (Viol)2,2/3 Solo to Accompaniment 2nd  8
Fifteenth (Viol)  2 Cathedral Chimes  
Bourdon16 Snare Drum  
Tibia Clausa  8 Castanets  
Stopped Flute  8 Tambourine  
Tibia Piccolo  4 Triangle  
Stopped Flute  4 Tom Tom  
Tibia Twelfth2,2/3 Chinese Block  
Flute Twelfth2,2/3    
Piccolo  2 Tremulants  
Flageolet  2 Tibia / Tuba  
Flute Tierce1,3/5 Vox / Clarinet  
Contra Bombarde16 Main
Bombarde  8   
Octave Bombarde  4   
Clarinet  8   
Octave Clarinet  4   
Vox Humana16tc   
Vox Humana  8   
Vox Humana  4   
Cathedral Chimes  8   
Marimba Harp  8   
Carrillon Harp  8   
Glockenspiel  4   
Sleigh Bells  4   
    
    
Solo Second Touch    
Tibia  8   
Tuba Horn  8   
Snare Drum    

8 thumb pistons to Solo
8 thumb pistons to Accompaniment
3 thumb pistons to Pedal

Toe piston to :- Surf
Toe piston to :- Syren
Toe Piston to :- Hoofs
Toe Piston to :- Bird Song
Toe Piston to :- Boat Whistle
Toe Piston to :- Train Effect
Toe Piston to :- Triangle
Toe Piston to :- Klaxon
Toe Piston to :- Fire Bell

Thumb Piston to :- Telephone Bell

Ventil Switches to:-
Bombarde, Tuba, Tibia, Bourdon, Flute, Diaphone, Diapason, Violone, Violonecello, Celeste, Clarinet, Vox

Blower Start / Stop
Lift Up, Down, Stop

Picture House, Paisley

Hilsdon's final foray into the cinema organ world, was the 3 manual 10 rank instrument he built for the Picture House Paisely, when it was extensively modernised in 1929, re-opening with the organ installed in February of 1930.  Its console, although very similar to that of the Playhouse, was smaller and more compact and lacked some of the 'finesse' of Hilsdon's earlier horseshoe consoles.  Originally positioned on a lift in the centre of the orchestra pit, an illuminated surround was fitted to the console for a short period of time.  The console was moved to a fixed position at the stage right side of the pit when the cinema was altered circa 1964 for Bingo use and painted (badly) gloss white with gold trim.


The Picture House, Paisley's Hilsdon organ console
prior to leaving the Glasgow Organ Works,
with Hilsdon's staff pictured.


The organ was removed in 1980 prior to the auditorium's closure in 1985 and its subsequent demolition, although the fine facade of the cinema remains as the entrance to a shopping mall.

THE MAIN CHAMBER PIPEWORK


Main Chamber pipework

The Diaphone

The 16' Viole

L-R Open Diapason, Dulciana,
Flute, Celeste, Viol

mitred bass of 8' Viol
and percussion behind

mitred bass of 16' Viole


THE SOLO CHAMBER PIPEWORK

Tuba Horn at front


L-R Tuba Horn, Tibia
Vox Humana, French Horn, Clarinet

Bottom of 16' Tuba


Percussion behind
French Horn bass

L-R Clarinet, French Horn
Vox Humana, Tibia, Tuba Horn

Boots of 16' Tuba



It was in the hands of the East Kilbride Cinema Organ Society for a number of years, who intended amalgamating it with their 10 rank Wurlitzer (from the Odeon/New Victoria Cinema, Edinburgh), but this project was never completed.  The Dulciana rank and the 18 note Diaphone, the only remaining example of a Hilsdon Diaphone, were scrapped at this time and STOPS acquired the console and relays for use in the Playhouse, Edinburgh.  The console was installed in the theatre to replace the badly damaged original console of the Playhouse organ and the relays were modified to control the additional ranks of pipes added to the Playhouse organ.  After a period of time in storage the rest of the organ was sold into private ownership, but again, after a period of time in storage, its parts were offered for sale on the open market.  STOPS were fortunate in being able to purchase the pipes and windchests of the organ at that time.

The Specification of the Unit Organ installed in the Picture House, Paisley

H. Hilsdon Ltd, Glasgow Organ Works, 1930.

Organ installed in two chambers, Solo above the Main, in the auditorium left side of the proscenium

3 Manuals CC to C, 61 notes, and
Concave and Radiating pedalboard CCC-F 30 notes.


MAIN CHAMBER = Diaphonic Diapason, Stopped Flute, Viol d'Orchestre, Viol Celeste, Dulciana, Traps, Effects, Chimes

SOLO CHAMBER = Tuba Horn, Tibia Clausa, French Horn, Clarinet, Vox Humana, Marimba Harp, Carillon Harp, Glockenspiel, Sleigh Bells

Stops were grouped by pitch and tonality

PEDAL ORGAN  ACCOMPANIMENT (centre manual) 
Diaphonic Bass (resultant)32 Violone16
Diaphone16 Diaphonic Diapason  8
Violone16 Violoncello  8
Quint (Diaphone)10,2/3 Cello Celeste  8tc
Diaphonic Diapason  8 Dulciana  8
Violoncello  8 Octave  4
Bourdon16 Violin  4
Bass Flute  8 Violin Celeste  4
Trombone16 Twelfth (Violin)2,2/3
Tuba  8 Fifteenth (Violin)  2
Bass Drum  Bourdon16
Kettle Drum  Tibia Clausa  8
Clash Cymbal  Stopped Flute  8
Roll Cymbal  Tibia Piccolo  4
  Stopped Flute  4
  Flute Twelfth2,2/3
Pedal Second Touch  Flageolet  2
Bass Drum  Trombone16
Kettle Drum  Tuba Horn  8
Clash Cymbal Clarion  4
Roll Cymbal  French Horn  8
   French Horn  4
   Marimba  8
   Carillon Harp  8
SOLO upper manual  Snare Drum  
Violone16  
Diaphonic Diapason  8 Accompaniment Second Touch  
Violoncello  8 Diaphonic Diapason  8
Violin  4 Tibia  8
Bourdon16 Trombone16
Tibia Clausa  8 Tuba  8
Stopped Flute  8 Clarion  4
Tibia Piccolo  4 Cathedral Chimes  
Stopped Flute  4 Snare Drum
Tibia Twelfth2,2/3 Chinese Block
Piccolo   2 Tom Tom  
Flageolet  2 Tambourine  
Trombone16 Castanets  
Tuba  8 Triangle  
Octave Tuba  4   
French Horn  8   
French Horn  4 Tremulants  
Clarinet  8 Main  
Octave Clarinet  4 Solo  
Vox Humana  8 Tuba Horn  
Cathedral Chimes  8   
Marimba Harp  8   
Carillon Harp  8   
Glockenspiel  4   
Sleigh Bells  4   
 
ORCHESTRAL bottom manual  
Violin  8   
Violin Celeste  8tc   
Dulciana  8   
Violin  4    
Violin Celeste  4    
Tibia Clausa  8   
Stopped Flute  8   
Stopped Flute  4   
Flute Twelfth2,2/3    
Flageolet  2   
French Horn16tc   
French Horn  8   
Octave French Horn  4   
Clarinet16tc   
Clarinet  8   
Octave Clarinet  4   
Vox Humana16tc   
Vox Humana  8   
Vox Humana  4   
Cathedral Chimes  8   
Marimba Harp16tc   
Marimba Harp  8   
Carrillon Harp10,2/3   
Carrillon Harp  8   
Carrillon Harp5,1/3   
Glockenspiel  4   
Sleigh Bells  4   

The next phase of the various Hilsdon organs is detailed in the section covering the history of the Playhouse, Edinburgh's instrument.

                                                                                                       
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